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Protests spread as activists fight telescope in Hawaii

Protests spread as activists fight telescope in Hawaii Demonstrations against a giant telescope planned for Hawaii's tallest peak have spread to New York, Las Vegas and Honolulu's tourist mecca of Waikiki as Native Hawaiians push to protect what they say is a sacred place. In Nevada, a few hundred Native Hawaiians and former Hawaii residents gathered under the famous "Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas" sign to show their solidarity with protesters back home.


Justice Department Warns Mueller Not to Tell Congress Too Much

Justice Department Warns Mueller Not to Tell Congress Too Much Chip Somodevilla/GettyTwo days before Robert Mueller testifies before Congress, the Justice Department has sent him a letter warning that he “must remain within the boundaries” of the public report on the Russia investigation.Deputy Attorney General Bradley Weinsheimer told the former special counsel that he was restricted in what he could say because the probe included matters of executive privilege—which allows the president to keep certain information secret.“These privileges would include discussion about investigative steps or decisions made during your investigation not otherwise described in the public version of your report,” the letter said.Weinsheimer said it was “standard practice” for DOJ witnesses to refuse to answer questions that touched on issues of privilege so the department can later find a way to provide answers to Congress while “protecting Executive Branch confidentiality interests.”Democrats’ Job Is to Bring Mueller Down From Mount Above-It-AllThe letter came in response to a request by Mueller two weeks ago for guidance from the Justice Department on his Wednesday testimony before the House Judiciary and Intelligence committees.Mueller has already said that he doesn't intend to stray from his report, which outlined 10 episodes of possible obstruction of justice by President Trump but did not declare whether he had committed a crime or impeachable offense.Democrats on the committees are hoping to pry some new details from the famously tight-lipped former FBI director about Trump’s actions and his view of those actions.The DOJ letter reiterated that the department deems Mueller’s testimony “unnecessary” but acknowledged that the decision to answer questions is his to make—while hammering down on the point that he should not disclose anything that isn’t in the report or Mueller’s May 29 public statement.In that statement, Mueller appeared to contradict Attorney General William Barr by saying that he did not make a determination about whether Trump broke the law because DOJ policy prohibits indictment for a sitting president, and not necessarily because he did not think a crime had occurred.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


11,000-HP Dodge Hellcat Drag Racer Will Make Your Head Pop

Internal Probe Reveals SEAL Team 10 Operators’ Cocaine Use

Internal Probe Reveals SEAL Team 10 Operators’ Cocaine Use AFPSome SEAL Team 10 special warfare operators allegedly used cocaine or spiked their alcohol with it, according to an internal investigation obtained by the Navy Times following a Freedom of Information Act Request. In Little Creek, Virginia, six SEALs were caught using cocaine and other illicit substances, the report says. SEALs told investigators that the urinalysis tests were easy to beat, as they were not screened very often, and when they were, they’d often switch out tainted urine for clean urine samples, according to the report. No SEALs went to court-martial in the wake of the urinalysis screening, in Virginia, Naval Special Warfare Command spokeswoman Commander Tamara Lawrence told Navy Times, adding that four were administratively separated from the sea service. The urinalysis program has now been updated, said Lawrence, and will be given more often. The test administers will also be retrained. A command report obtained by the Navy Times shows that in mid-2018, the testing program “suffered from serious deficiencies, which did not maintain accountability for substance abuse and adversely affected readiness.” Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


The Latest: Hospital sued over school principal's death

The Latest: Hospital sued over school principal's death A hospital sued by the family of a New Jersey high school principal who died after a procedure to donate blood marrow to an anonymous French teenager says it is saddened by the tragic death. Hackensack University Medical Center is a defendant in the suit filed by the fiancee and family of Derrick Nelson, who fell into a coma in February and died in April. A spokeswoman for Hackensack Meridian Health says the hospital isn't commenting on the lawsuit but says it has been in touch with Nelson's family and fiance Sheronda Braker.


NASA Finally Completes the Orion Crew Capsule

NASA Finally Completes the Orion Crew Capsule NASA hopes the capsule will take astronauts back to the Moon, and Mars after that.


Report: Pence canceled trip to avoid contact with an alleged drug dealer

Report: Pence canceled trip to avoid contact with an alleged drug dealer Vice President Mike Pence abruptly canceled a trip to New Hampshire this month to avoid shaking hands with an alleged interstate drug dealer, Politico reported Monday.


Gambian soldier names ex-president in reporter's 2004 murder

Gambian soldier names ex-president in reporter's 2004 murder A Gambian army officer on Monday accused ex-president Yahya Jammeh of ordering the 2004 murder of journalist Deyda Hydara and admitted he was involved in the killing. Hydara, who was editor and co-founder of the independent The Point daily and a correspondent for AFP and Journalists Without Borders (RSF), was killed by unidentified gunmen in his car on the outskirts of the Gambian capital Banjul in December 2004. The murder was widely condemned locally and abroad as another sign of Jammeh's despotic rule and his stifling of all opposition in the former British colony.


This Is the ATV-Mounted Jammer That Took Down an Iranian Drone

This Is the ATV-Mounted Jammer That Took Down an Iranian Drone The drone was less than a mile from the USS Boxer when the Marines caused it to crash.


These Versatile Corn Recipes Are Perfect for Any Meal


Top Stories - Google News

What You Should Know About the Equifax Data Breach Settlement - Krebs on Security

Federal Budget Would Raise Spending by $320 Billion - The New York Times

Millions should stop taking aspirin for heart health, study says - NBCNews.com

Millions should stop taking aspirin for heart health, study says   NBCNews.com

Millions of people who take aspirin to prevent a heart attack may need to rethink the pill-popping, Harvard researchers reported Monday in the Annals of Internal ...

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Apple in Advanced Talks to Buy Intel’s Smartphone-Modem Chip Business - The Wall Street Journal

JD McCrary Made Bank for 'Lion King' Reboot - TMZ

What's behind Donald Trump's attack on 'The Squad' as 'not very smart?' - CNN

Tim Duncan, Spurs Agree to Contract as Assistant Coach on Gregg Popovich's Staff - Bleacher Report


World News Headlines - Yahoo! News

Putin gives Russian citizenship to Novatek's finance chief, a U.S. national

Putin gives Russian citizenship to Novatek's finance chief, a U.S. national President Vladimir Putin handed Russian citizenship to gas producer Novatek's veteran finance chief Mark Gyetvay on Monday, a move that could potentially help the U.S. national bypass some sanctions restrictions. U.S. sanctions imposed on Russia in 2014 ban U.S. nationals and companies from helping organise long-term funding for some major Russian firms, including Novatek. When the U.S. and the EU imposed sanctions on Russia, executives with foreign passports at companies affected including Novatek - the country's largest non-state natural gas producer - and state bank VTB handed over responsibility for organising new debt or equity issuance to colleagues without EU or U.S. passports.


Britain's May chairs emergency session on seized tanker

Britain's May chairs emergency session on seized tanker British Prime Minister Theresa May chaired an emergency security session on Monday to discuss how to respond to Iran's seizure of a British-flagged tanker in the Strait of Hormuz. Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt plans to brief Parliament on the Friday seizure of the Stena Impero tanker and its crew of 23, now in a heavily guarded Iranian port. Iran released new video showing the ship's crew for the first time on Monday, an apparent attempt to show they were unharmed.


Iran Says It Will Execute Group of Alleged CIA Spies

Iran Says It Will Execute Group of Alleged CIA Spies (Bloomberg) -- Iran, locked in a worsening political standoff with Western powers, has handed down death sentences to several nationals accused of being part of a CIA-trained spy network uncovered earlier this year, an official said on Monday.U.S. President Donald Trump denounced the Iranian report as “totally false” on Twitter Monday. “Just more lies and propaganda (like their shot down drone) put out by a Religious Regime that is Badly Failing and has no idea what to do,” Trump said. Beyond that, an administration official said the White House doesn’t comment on intelligence activities.In Tehran, a senior intelligence official told foreign media that 17 people had been arrested. None of the suspects are dual nationals, according to the official, who declined to be identified and didn’t say how many were sentenced to death.The announcement marks a show of force by Iran at a time of turbulent ties with the U.S. after the Trump administration withdrew from the 2015 nuclear accord with the Islamic Republic and reimposed crippling sanctions on its economy.The friction was made worse by a diplomatic crisis between Iran and the U.K., which seized an Iranian oil tanker in Gibraltar earlier this month, saying it carried oil bound for Syria in violation of United Nations sanctions. Iran responded by holding a British tanker on Friday near the Strait of Hormuz, a shipping chokepoint through which about 40% of the world’s seaborne oil travels.Asked about Iran’s arrest of spies Monday on Fox News, U.S. Secretary of State Michael Pompeo said that Iran “has a long history of lying.” Iran’s announcement about the arrests is “further evidence of the outlaw nature of the Iranian regime,” he added.Iran has also accused Trump and his administration of lying about its operations related to Iran, including over U.S. statements that it brought down an Iranian drone last week.The Iranian Intelligence Ministry has detected an uptick in U.S. efforts to recruit spies in Iran since Trump’s election in 2016 and the appointment of Gina Haspel as director of the CIA last year, the Iranian official said.Iranian officials have identified the CIA agents who had recruited the suspects as diplomats based in Turkey, Zimbabwe and Finland.A program aired by state television on Monday showed clips of Trump and National Security Adviser John Bolton with Hormuz as the backdrop. The show identified the alleged members of the cell and contained what the network said were confessions by the accused, whose faces were blurred and voices distorted.The alleged spies were trained by the CIA to gather classified information from sensitive locations in Iran including military bases, nuclear facilities and economic centers, the official said. The American spy agency lured recruits by promising residency and jobs in the U.S. and safe passage out of Iran, setting up shell companies as a cover to approach and hire Iranians, he added.(Corrects third paragraph to say 17 arrested.)\--With assistance from Ladane Nasseri, Arsalan Shahla and Caitlin Webber.To contact the reporters on this story: Golnar Motevalli in Tehran at gmotevalli@bloomberg.net;Josh Wingrove in Washington at jwingrove4@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Alaa Shahine at asalha@bloomberg.net, Amy TeibelFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


IAEA chief Yukiya Amano who oversaw Iran deal dies at 72

IAEA chief Yukiya Amano who oversaw Iran deal dies at 72 Yukiya Amano, the Japanese diplomat who led the International Atomic Energy Agency for a decade and was extensively involved in negotiations over Iran's nuclear program and the cleanup of the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster, has died at 72, the agency announced Monday. Amano, who had wide experience in disarmament, non-proliferation diplomacy and nuclear energy issues, had been chief of the key U.N. agency that regulates nuclear use worldwide since 2009. The news of his death comes at a time of increasing concerns and escalating tensions over Iran's nuclear program, after U.S. President Donald Trump left a 2015 deal with world powers that restricted Iran's nuclear program in return for sanctions relief.


Iran says it arrested 17 CIA spies, some sentenced to death

Iran says it arrested 17 CIA spies, some sentenced to death Iran said Monday it has arrested 17 Iranian nationals allegedly recruited by the Central Intelligence Agency to spy on the country's nuclear and military sites, and that some of them have already been sentenced to death. The arrests took place over the past months, and those taken into custody worked on "sensitive sites" in the country's military and nuclear facilities, an Iranian intelligence official told a press conference in Tehran. The announcement comes as Iran's nuclear deal with world powers is unraveling and tensions have spiked in the Persian Gulf region.


Syrian activists say airstrikes kill 27 in rebel-held town

Syrian activists say airstrikes kill 27 in rebel-held town Multiple Airstrikes hit a busy market in a rebel-controlled town in northwestern Syria on Monday, killing at least 27 people and turning several buildings into piles of rubble, according to opposition activists and a war monitor. Shortly afterward, state media said rebels shelled a government-held village, killing seven. Government troops, backed by Russian air cover, try to push their way into the enclave near the Turkish border, which is dominated by al-Qaida-linked militants and other jihadi groups.


Trump: Iran claim to break up CIA network 'totally false'

Trump: Iran claim to break up CIA network 'totally false' US President Donald Trump on Monday denied Iran's claim that it dismantled a CIA spy ring and arrested 17 suspects with alleged links to the US intelligence agency. "The report of Iran capturing CIA spies is totally false. Zero truth," Trump tweeted.


UPDATE 1-Trump denies Iran arrested 17 people accused of being U.S. spies

UPDATE 1-Trump denies Iran arrested 17 people accused of being U.S. spies "The Report of Iran capturing CIA spies is totally false. Just more lies and propaganda (like their shot down drone) put out by a Religious Regime that is Badly Failing and has no idea what to do," Trump wrote on Twitter. Iran announced the arrests in state media, saying the alleged spies had been captured in the 12 months to March 2019.


U.K.’s New Premier Risks Majority Declining to One in Parliament

U.K.’s New Premier Risks Majority Declining to One in Parliament (Bloomberg) -- If you thought Prime Minister Theresa May faced difficult arithmetic in the U.K. House of Commons, then her successor will have it even harder, after a series of defections and the potential loss of two seats in special elections.Either Boris Johnson, the favorite to be named leader on Tuesday, or Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt faces the prospect of the majority enjoyed by the Conservative Party and their Democratic Unionist Party allies falling to just one. That makes the job of stewarding any vision of Brexit through Parliament trickier, and it also hands more power to the DUP, which refused three times to back the deal May struck with the European Union.Here’s how the parliamentary arithmetic stacks up:How many Members of Parliament are there?There are 650 Members of Parliament. The seven MPs with the Irish Nationalist Sinn Fein party don’t take their seats, while Speaker John Bercow and his three deputies don’t vote, because they’re required to be impartial. That leaves 639 voting MPs -- meaning 320 are needed to guarantee a majority.To complicate matters further, The Welsh seat of Brecon and Radnorshire is currently vacant because its constituents voted to unseat the Tory MP, Chris Davies, after he was convicted for making false expense claims. A special election is scheduled for Aug. 1, with Davies standing again for the Tories.How many Conservatives are there?Not including Bercow, there are 312 Conservatives, plus 10 MPs from the DUP, which is allied to the ruling party. But one Tory, Eleanor Laing, is a deputy speaker, so must be discounted, giving them 321 MPs. On Monday, the Tory Dover MP Charlie Elphicke was charged with three counts of sexual assault, which he denies. He’s been suspended from the party, taking the official number down to 320. In practice, Elphicke is still likely to vote with them.How long will Elphicke’s trial take?Elphicke’s first court appearance is set for Sept. 6, but a full trial is likely to be several months after that. If he were to be convicted, he might be automatically excluded from Parliament, depending on the length of any jail sentence. But he’s likely to be still voting with the Conservatives as the Oct. 31 Brexit deadline approaches.What about the opposition?The main opposition Labour Party has 247 MPs, two of whom are deputy speakers and so don’t vote. The Scottish National Party has 35, the Liberal Democrats have 12, and other minor parties and independent MPs -- three of whom quit the Tories earlier this year -- total 25. That brings opposition votes to 317.So where does that leave us?The Tories and their DUP allies have 321 votes, including Elphicke. Opposition parties and independents have 317. If, as polls suggest, the Liberal Democrats win the Welsh special election next month, that’ll increase to 318. And if Elphicke is eventually forced out and replaced in a special election by another opposition MP -- Dover was Labour-held before he took it in 2010 -- then the government will be down to 320, with the opposition on 319.To contact the reporter on this story: Alex Morales in London at amorales2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Robert Hutton, Stuart BiggsFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Russian oligarchs in Britain scrutinised by US investigation into election meddling

Russian oligarchs in Britain scrutinised by US investigation into election meddling US Senators investigating Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election are renewing their focus on the activities of Russian oligarchs based in Britain. US congressional investigators say they are particularly interested in interviewing alleged associates of Russian Oligarch Oleg Deripaska, who is known to have close ties with Russian President Vladimir Putin. As part of its ongoing investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election campaign, the US Senate Intelligence Committee has now written a formal letter to a London-based security consultant requesting his presence in Washington to give evidence. In the letter, a copy of which has been seen by The Telegraph, the bipartisan committee of US Senators wants British-based security consultant Walter Soriano to attend a special closed session in Washington to answer questions about his alleged association with Mr Deripaska, who has consistently denied any wrongdoing, as well as other key figures named in its Russian investigation. The committee also expressed an interest in Mr Soriano’s possible links with two former MI6 officers, Christopher Steele and Christopher Burrows, who were responsible for producing a highly damaging “dossier” on US President Donald Trump’s alleged ties with Russia. Mr Soriano is an Israeli cyber security consultant whose company USG Security Ltd has offices in London next door to Orbis Business Intelligence, which is run by Mr Steele and Mr Burrows. The committee has asked Mr Soriano to give oral evidence in Washington as well as producing “all documents and records, including hard copies or electronically stored information” relating to any dealings he may have had with a number of key figures in its Russia investigation. These include Mr Deripaska “or any of his employees or associates” as well as “Orbis Business Intelligence, or any of its employees or associates, including but not limited to Christopher Steele and Christopher Burrows”. Senators have also asked Mr Soriano to provide material relating to any dealings he has had with other key figures in their two-year investigation into Russian meddling. These include Paul Manafort, a former key aide of Mr Trump who is serving a seven-year jail term for fraud, Michael Flynn, the Trump administration’s first National Security Advisor, and Victor Boyarkin, a former officer in Russia’s GRU intelligence service who works for one of Mr Deripaska’s network of companies and is now subject to US sanctions. US investigators say the decision to summon Mr Soriano to Washington is a significant step in their attempts to understand the activities of Russian oligarchs linked to Mr Putin in Britain. “We are making progress with the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election and we are keen to talk to anyone who may have knowledge of what transpired during that time,” commented a senior US official. Mr Soriano, who is little-known in Britain and is understood to be an Israeli citizen, is a controversial figure in Israel, where he has been accused in the Israeli media of spying on police officers involved in the corruption probe into Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu, charges he denies. Mr Soriano has also produced a documentary about Mr Netanyahu’s late brother, Yoni Netanyahu, who was killed leading Israel’s raid on Entebbe Airport in Uganda in 1976. The decision by US investigators to refocus their inquiry on the activities of Russian oligarchs and intelligence officers based in Britain follows this week’s warning by Conservative MP Sir Roger Gale in the Commons that Russia was seeking to rebuild its spying network in Britain after most of its spies were expelled in the wake of last year’s Salisbury poisoning. Mr Soriano could not be reached for comment.



Economy News Headlines - Yahoo! News

11,000-HP Dodge Hellcat Drag Racer Will Make Your Head Pop

Internal Probe Reveals SEAL Team 10 Operators’ Cocaine Use

Internal Probe Reveals SEAL Team 10 Operators’ Cocaine Use AFPSome SEAL Team 10 special warfare operators allegedly used cocaine or spiked their alcohol with it, according to an internal investigation obtained by the Navy Times following a Freedom of Information Act Request. In Little Creek, Virginia, six SEALs were caught using cocaine and other illicit substances, the report says. SEALs told investigators that the urinalysis tests were easy to beat, as they were not screened very often, and when they were, they’d often switch out tainted urine for clean urine samples, according to the report. No SEALs went to court-martial in the wake of the urinalysis screening, in Virginia, Naval Special Warfare Command spokeswoman Commander Tamara Lawrence told Navy Times, adding that four were administratively separated from the sea service. The urinalysis program has now been updated, said Lawrence, and will be given more often. The test administers will also be retrained. A command report obtained by the Navy Times shows that in mid-2018, the testing program “suffered from serious deficiencies, which did not maintain accountability for substance abuse and adversely affected readiness.” Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Ethiopia says army to take over security in troubled south

Ethiopia says army to take over security in troubled south Ethiopia announced Monday that soldiers and federal police will take over security in a restive southern region following days of violence that has left at least 18 people dead. "The regular security structure has been unable to ensure rule of law and has been stymied by various agendas," said a statement read on regional state television late Monday. The unrest stems from efforts by the Sidama ethnic group, the largest in the southern region, to establish a new semi-autonomous state - a project that has put them on a collision course with the government of Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed.


More officer diversity won't cut racial disparity in US police shootings – study

More officer diversity won't cut racial disparity in US police shootings – study Research found as percentage of black officers who fired in fatal shootings increased, the citizen shot was more likely to be blackThe report also found that of all the shootings analysed, in 56% of fatal officer-involved shootings a single officer fired their weapon. Photograph: Eric Thayer/ReutersIncreasing the diversity of America’s police officers will not necessarily cut racial disparities in fatal police shootings, according to a new study which claims that race-specific crime rates are a bigger factor than the race of the officer.Research published by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Monday found that as the percentage of black officers who shot in FOIS (fatal officer-involved shootings) increased, the citizen shot was more likely to be black than white. In a similar vein, as the number of Hispanic officers went up, the person shot was more likely to be black or Hispanic than white.The authors, led by David Johnson, a social cognitive psychologist at the University of Maryland, College Park, said the link between officer race and the race of citizens fatally killed are the result of officers and citizens usually coming from the same population base.They claimed to find no evidence that white officers were more likely to shoot minority groups than officers of colour.Researchers came to their conclusions by creating a database of more than 900 FOIS that occurred in the US in 2015, including officer race, sex and years of experience, using information from the Guardian and the Washington Post. Researchers then analysed the different factors to try to predict the race of the person shot.The Guardian’s the Counted investigation found that in 2015 a total of 1,134 people died at the hands of law enforcement and that young black men were nine times more likely than other Americans to be killed by police officers.While this latest study by Johnson acknowledges there are racial disparities in shootings, it claims race-specific crime rather than officer race best predicts the race of the victim.It found that in counties where minorities were responsible for higher rates of violent crime, a person fatally shot was 3.7 times more likely to be black than white and 3.3 times more likely to be Hispanic than white.“Although officer race was related to racial disparities, the fact that black and Hispanic civilians were more likely to be shot by same-race officers was largely explained by similarities between officer and county demographics,” stated the report. “Because racial disparities in FOIS do not vary based on officer race, hiring more diverse officers may not reduce racial disparities in FOIS.”While it acknowledged that greater officer diversity would probably have other benefits – such as improving police understanding of communities and increasing trust – it said it would not “meaningfully reduce” racial disparities in fatal shootings.It added: “One of our clearest results is that violent crime rates strongly predict the race of a person fatally shot. At a high level, reducing race-specific violent crime should be an effective way to reduce fatal shootings of black and Hispanic adults.”The report also found that of all the shootings analysed, in 56% of FOIS a single officer fired their weapon. In nearly 40% of cases, between two and four officers fired. In the research, 79% of officers were white, 12% Hispanic, 6% black and 3% from other racial groups. Nearly all – 96% – of officers were male and on average officers had nearly 10 years of experience.


The Latest: Hospital sued over school principal's death

The Latest: Hospital sued over school principal's death A hospital sued by the family of a New Jersey high school principal who died after a procedure to donate blood marrow to an anonymous French teenager says it is saddened by the tragic death. Hackensack University Medical Center is a defendant in the suit filed by the fiancee and family of Derrick Nelson, who fell into a coma in February and died in April. A spokeswoman for Hackensack Meridian Health says the hospital isn't commenting on the lawsuit but says it has been in touch with Nelson's family and fiance Sheronda Braker.


NASA Finally Completes the Orion Crew Capsule

NASA Finally Completes the Orion Crew Capsule NASA hopes the capsule will take astronauts back to the Moon, and Mars after that.


Fox News’ Shep Smith Grills Embattled Puerto Rico Governor: Can You Name Anyone Who Supports You?

Fox News’ Shep Smith Grills Embattled Puerto Rico Governor: Can You Name Anyone Who Supports You? During his first television interview since the scandal broke out over leaked private chats that have resulted in near-unanimous calls for his resignation, Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rosselló struggled to come up with a single name when Fox News anchor Shepard Smith pressed him to offer up anyone who currently supports him.With hundreds of thousands of Puerto Ricans taking to the streets of San Juan on Monday to demand Rosselló’s resignation after the governor said he wouldn’t step down on Sunday, Smith pointed out that “corruption is rampant” on the island before highlighting why the profanity-laced leaked chats have caused such backlash.“So attacks on women, attacks on gays, attacks on the dead relatives of your own residents on your own island and after that who is left to support you?” Smith asked the governor. “Is it even safe for you to govern?”Rosselló, meanwhile, meekly said he has apologized and is trying to make amends, prompting the Fox anchor to ask him what exactly he’s apologized for.After claiming he’s apologized for the chats, the embattled governor attempted to say he wants to move on to battling corruption, leading Smith to remind him that the corruption is within Rosselló’s own administration.Noting the widespread calls for him to step down, Smith grilled the governor on his lack of support in Puerto Rico, wondering aloud: “Who has come forward to support you?”“There are folks who have supported me, who have come forward,” Rosselló muttered, causing Smith to demand a name. The governor, however, struggled to answer the Fox News host.“Can you give me one name?” Smith pressed. “Just one name, governor.”Finally, after Smith continued to confront Rosselló, noting that the governor wasn’t able to come up with anyone who had his back, Rosselló finally tossed out the name of the mayor of one city: San Sebastian Mayor Javier Jimenez.Moments after the interview aired, however, Jimenez told CBS News' David Begnaud that he did not, in fact, support the governor.“There are other folks that have established people in the legislature and people in the Senate, as well, said that have supported me,” the governor added. “They have supported the fact that I will not run and I shouldn’t seek reelection but they have established it’s important to follow the rule of law.”Smith went on to relentlessly grill Rosselló, questioning whether the governor has “appropriately apologized” while highlighting that Rosselló has so far refused to meet with the Puerto Rican people who are demanding his resignation.Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Report: Pence canceled trip to avoid contact with an alleged drug dealer

Report: Pence canceled trip to avoid contact with an alleged drug dealer Vice President Mike Pence abruptly canceled a trip to New Hampshire this month to avoid shaking hands with an alleged interstate drug dealer, Politico reported Monday.



Business - Google News

What You Should Know About the Equifax Data Breach Settlement - Krebs on Security

Trump announces support for two-year bipartisan budget deal that boosts spending, suspends debt limit - The Washington Post

Millions should stop taking aspirin for heart health, study says - NBCNews.com

Apple in Advanced Talks to Buy Intel’s Smartphone-Modem Chip Business - The Wall Street Journal


Sports News Headlines - Yahoo! News

Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?

Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay? Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.


After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games

After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games The former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.


Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game

Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline

Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it

Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it

Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness

For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.



April 9th, 2012

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