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Bodies in submerged Missouri vehicle bring storm toll to 9

Bodies in submerged Missouri vehicle bring storm toll to 9 OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The bodies of a man and a woman were discovered Friday in a submerged vehicle near the Mississippi River in Missouri, bringing the death toll to nine from storms that have ravaged the central U.S. this week and threaten major flooding through the holiday weekend.


Wisconsin man who kidnapped Jayme Closs gets life in prison

Wisconsin man who kidnapped Jayme Closs gets life in prison BARRON, Wis. (AP) — A Wisconsin man was sentenced Friday to life in prison for kidnapping 13-year-old Jayme Closs and killing her parents after the girl told the judge she that wanted him "locked up forever" for trying to steal her.


Fox News’ Chris Wallace: Nancy Pelosi Is ‘Clearly’ Getting Under Trump’s Skin

Fox News’ Chris Wallace: Nancy Pelosi Is ‘Clearly’ Getting Under Trump’s Skin Fox News anchor Chris Wallace said Friday morning that Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi is definitely getting inside President Trump’s head with her recent remarks, such as saying the president threw a “temper tantrum” and that she prays for Trump because she’s concerned about his well-being.Appearing on Fox News’ America’s Newsroom, the Fox News Sunday host was asked what he thought about the “ongoing feud,” a feud that’s featured the president sharing a deceptively edited video Thursday night (which he got from Fox Business Network) of Pelosi “stammering” through a press conference.“I have to say, I’m not sure who was trolling whom,” Wallace responded to Fox anchor Sandra Smith. “I think they both were trying to get under each other’s skin.”The veteran journalist went on to note that Pelosi has been successful in driving the president nuts, referencing the recent presser in which Trump brought up several senior aides to attest to his calm demeanor.‘Fox & Friends’ Admit Diamond & Silk Mocked Doctored Video of ‘Crazy Nancy’“There’s no question that Nancy Pelosi when she starts talking about ‘I pray for the president’ and ‘perhaps his family should have an intervention’ was trying to get at the president,” Wallace said. “And clearly she succeeded to some degree in getting under his skin, when yesterday at that press conference he called on, what, about four or five members of his administration to confirm the fact that he didn’t have a temper tantrum, didn’t lose his temper when he ended the meeting on infrastructure on Wednesday.”Wallace, however, made sure to give the president his due credit, saying that Trump “gives as good as he gets” by pointing out that the president called Pelosi “Crazy Nancy” and claimed the speaker is “losing it.” “You know, look, as a political reporter in this town it’s all very entertaining but as an American what it means is that nothing gets done,” Wallace added. “That has to be concerning whether it’s infrastructure—there are a whole lot of things that just have to get done.”Following Wallace’s segment on Friday, the president stood by his attacks on Pelosi, suggesting to reporters that he tweeted out the manipulated video of Pelosi to “help the country” while claiming he only “responded in kind” because she “made horrible statements” about him.Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Rape and incest account for hardly any abortions. So why are they now a focus?

Rape and incest account for hardly any abortions. So why are they now a focus? Just 1% of women obtain an abortion because they became pregnant through rape, and less than 0.5% do so because of incest.


Trump memo: Former intelligence officials and Democrats attack president's 'un-American' security instructions

Trump memo: Former intelligence officials and Democrats attack president's 'un-American' security instructions Donald Trump gave attorney general William Barr the unilateral authority to declassify intelligence documents and ordered the US intelligence community to “quickly and fully cooperate” with his work in an official memorandum.The move is meant to accelerate Mr Barr’s inquiry into whether US officials improperly monitored or carried out surveillance on the president’s 2016 campaign.The directive signed on Thursday night alarmed former intelligence officials and Democratic legislators, who see it as a move to “investigate the investigators” probing the president’s alleged ties to Russia.David Kris, former head of the justice department’s national security division, told the AP that it’s “very unusual — unprecedented in my experience — for a non-intelligence officer to be given absolute declassification authority over the intelligence”.John McLaughlin, former deputy director of the CIA who served as acting director in 2004, tweeted disapproval as well.“Giving Barr declassification authority for this investigation is a really bad idea,” Mr McLaughlin wrote. “The agencies can cooperate but must retain their legal responsibility for protecting sources. Congressional intelligence committees need to stand in the door on this one.”The move gives Mr Barr the power to unilaterally unseal documents that the justice department has historically regarded as among its most highly secret, such as warrants obtained from the foreign intelligence surveillance court, which are never usually made public.Mr Trump also gave the declassification power explicitly to Mr Barr, noting that it would not extend to another attorney general. It is to be used only for Mr Barr’s review of the Russia investigation.Senator Mark Warner, the ranking Democrat on the Senate intelligence committee, pointed out that lawmakers still do not have the full Mueller report.“So of course the president gives sweeping declassification powers to an attorney general who has already shown that he has no problem selectively releasing information in order to mislead the American people,” Mr Warner tweeted on Friday morning. Representative Adam Schiff, chairman of the House intelligence committee, called Mr Trump’s decision “un-American”.“While Trump stonewalls the public from learning the truth about his obstruction of justice, Trump and Barr conspire to weaponise law enforcement and classified information against their political enemies,” Mr Schiff wrote on Twitter. “The cover-up has entered a new and dangerous phase.”


Rep. Nadler falls ill during public meeting on Upper West Side

Rep. Nadler falls ill during public meeting on Upper West Side Rep. Jerry Nadler, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, became ill during a public meeting on speed cameras with Mayor de Blasio on the Upper West Side.


UPDATE 2-Global Payments nearing $20 bln deal to buy Total System - source

UPDATE 2-Global Payments nearing $20 bln deal to buy Total System - source Payment technology company Global Payments Inc is nearing a deal to acquire peer Total System Services Inc (TSYS) for about $20 billion in an all-stock deal, a source familiar with the matter said on Friday. The transaction, which the source said could be announced as soon as Tuesday, is the latest large-scale consolidation effort by payments technology companies as industry players seek domination when spending is increasingly cashless. Both companies' stock prices jumped on news of a potential deal: by mid-afternoon on Friday, Global Payments had risen 3.4% and TSYS gained 11.4%.


Facebook accused of leaving 'broken children' in wake of its commercial aims, abuse inquiry hears

Facebook accused of leaving 'broken children' in wake of its commercial aims, abuse inquiry hears Facebook has been accused of leaving 'broken children' as collateral damage in the wake of their commercial aims, the child sex abuse inquiry has heard. Barrister William Chapman, representing the victims of abuse at the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse (IICSA), said social media companies were not preventing paedophiles reaching children as it was “contrary to their business model” and that their apps needed to be “fundamentally redesigned”. Police also warned that tech firms were going ahead with plans to encrypt more features "in the certain knowledge" it would lead to more children being abused. The warnings came as the inquiry’s hearing into online child abuse drew to a close yesterday. Over the last fortnight IICSA has heard evidence from Facebook, Apple, Microsoft and Google about their efforts to combat child abuse online. Giving his closing statement, Mr Chapman singled out Facebook as the “unacceptable face of social media”, citing that over half of reported grooming offences in 2017 and 2018 related to the company or its Instagram and WhatsApp apps. William Chapman giving his closing address to the inquiry He said that social networks scanned for evidence of abuse after it happened and that they now needed to change their business model to stop abusers easily contacting children. Mr Chapman said: “What they will not do, because it is contrary to their business model, is to restrict the opportunities for abuse before it takes place.” He added: “They leave behind broken children like so much collateral damage. “Money, they say, is no object but none you heard from has a dedicated budget to tackling this problem.” Among the recommendations being made to the inquiry on behalf of victims are for tech companies pay compensation to those abused via their services and that a new criminal offence be made of posing online as a child online without a reasonable excuse. Mr Chapman also accused tech companies of not giving the inquiry a “straight answer” about the scale of abuse on their sites and selectively releasing figures without context. Earlier in the hearing Microsoft failed to provide figures for how many children had been groomed on its live chat services Xbox Live and Skype and Facebook was similarly unable to say how many registered sex offenders had been caught using its services. “It is not acceptable to hide the extent of the problem on your platform in a black box out of which you prick pinholes for others to see only hints of the full horror within," said Mr Chapman. Later in the hearing, Debra Powell QC, speaking for the National Police Chiefs Council, warned that tech giants' plans to make ever more services encrypted would lead to more children being abused. Last month Facebook announced plans to add end-to-end encryption to its 1.3 billion-user Messenger service, meaning not even it will be able to see the content of messages. Ms Powell said: “Currently many technology companies are building in and offering to their users ever greater privacy protections, including end-to-end encryption, in the certain knowledge that this will make the detection and prevention of child sexual abuse and exploitation more difficult. “The inevitable result must be that more children will be abused and exploited and that their ordeals will go on for longer before the perpetrators can be caught, if they are caught at all.”


Download these 5 apps before your next trip

Download these 5 apps before your next trip There are millions of apps available for your phone, but you can't take all of them on your next trip. So which travel apps should you pack?


As UK's May announces exit date, a look at what happens next

As UK's May announces exit date, a look at what happens next LONDON (AP) — British Prime Minister Theresa May says she will step down as Conservative Party leader on June 7, sparking a contest to replace her as party chief and U.K. leader.



Top Stories - Google News

Federal judge blocks Mississippi abortion law - CNN

Kevin Durant defends social media use after spat with Chris Broussard - SF Gate

MAX’s Return to Flight Delayed by FAA’s Reevaluation of Safety Procedures for Older 737 Models - The Wall Street Journal

Trump defends personal attacks on Pelosi: 'Did you hear what she said about me?' - ABC News

Ashley Judd goes it alone, says she is not settling with Hollywood honcho Harvey Weinstein - NBC News

Apple bought a start-up that was working on monitoring asthma in children - CNBC

Why Trump is right to sidestep Congress on Saudi-UAE arms sales - Washington Examiner


World News Headlines - Yahoo! News

European elections: In Leipzig, a microcosm of Germany’s political scene

European elections: In Leipzig, a microcosm of Germany’s political scene Leipzig is a lively and broadminded town, the fastest growing in Germany and a cultural beacon. It celebrates Johann Sebastian Bach, who lived and worked here, and the city also hosts festivals for Goths, techno fans, and punks.


Mideast peace plan’s rocky start: Did US misread Arab politics?

Mideast peace plan’s rocky start: Did US misread Arab politics? The first phase of the long-awaited U.S. plan for Middle East peace, a summit in Bahrain to discuss economic investment in the Palestinians, is already beginning to look like a major miscalculation. The announcement this week of the June 25-26 event was met with a wave of derision among Palestinians and in the Arab press, culminating Wednesday in the Palestinian Authority’s official rejection of the U.S. invitation to attend. The central complaint: that the economic component of peace could not be addressed without agreeing first on fundamental political principles.


Why the SAT needs a character check

Why the SAT needs a character check To help more disadvantaged students get into higher education, the College Board has come up with a scoring metric beyond its own SAT test, which measures only verbal and math skills. Relying on public data, it looks at 15 factors in neighborhoods and schools that might negatively influence a candidate’s college readiness. If applicants come from a highly adverse background yet have decent but perhaps not stellar SAT scores, a college might then admit them.


Reporting in Mexico isn’t easy. Under AMLO, it may get harder.

Reporting in Mexico isn’t easy. Under AMLO, it may get harder. Mexico has been on track for an unwelcome press freedom record since President Andres Manuel López Obrador took office last December: six journalists slain in the same number of months. For more than a decade, the country has been one of the most dangerous places in the world to practice journalism, thanks to high levels of violence and impunity, combined with weak institutions.



Economy News Headlines - Yahoo! News

Bodies in submerged Missouri vehicle bring storm toll to 9

Bodies in submerged Missouri vehicle bring storm toll to 9 OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The bodies of a man and a woman were discovered Friday in a submerged vehicle near the Mississippi River in Missouri, bringing the death toll to nine from storms that have ravaged the central U.S. this week and threaten major flooding through the holiday weekend.


Wisconsin man who kidnapped Jayme Closs gets life in prison

Wisconsin man who kidnapped Jayme Closs gets life in prison BARRON, Wis. (AP) — A Wisconsin man was sentenced Friday to life in prison for kidnapping 13-year-old Jayme Closs and killing her parents after the girl told the judge she that wanted him "locked up forever" for trying to steal her.


Fox News’ Chris Wallace: Nancy Pelosi Is ‘Clearly’ Getting Under Trump’s Skin

Fox News’ Chris Wallace: Nancy Pelosi Is ‘Clearly’ Getting Under Trump’s Skin Fox News anchor Chris Wallace said Friday morning that Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi is definitely getting inside President Trump’s head with her recent remarks, such as saying the president threw a “temper tantrum” and that she prays for Trump because she’s concerned about his well-being.Appearing on Fox News’ America’s Newsroom, the Fox News Sunday host was asked what he thought about the “ongoing feud,” a feud that’s featured the president sharing a deceptively edited video Thursday night (which he got from Fox Business Network) of Pelosi “stammering” through a press conference.“I have to say, I’m not sure who was trolling whom,” Wallace responded to Fox anchor Sandra Smith. “I think they both were trying to get under each other’s skin.”The veteran journalist went on to note that Pelosi has been successful in driving the president nuts, referencing the recent presser in which Trump brought up several senior aides to attest to his calm demeanor.‘Fox & Friends’ Admit Diamond & Silk Mocked Doctored Video of ‘Crazy Nancy’“There’s no question that Nancy Pelosi when she starts talking about ‘I pray for the president’ and ‘perhaps his family should have an intervention’ was trying to get at the president,” Wallace said. “And clearly she succeeded to some degree in getting under his skin, when yesterday at that press conference he called on, what, about four or five members of his administration to confirm the fact that he didn’t have a temper tantrum, didn’t lose his temper when he ended the meeting on infrastructure on Wednesday.”Wallace, however, made sure to give the president his due credit, saying that Trump “gives as good as he gets” by pointing out that the president called Pelosi “Crazy Nancy” and claimed the speaker is “losing it.” “You know, look, as a political reporter in this town it’s all very entertaining but as an American what it means is that nothing gets done,” Wallace added. “That has to be concerning whether it’s infrastructure—there are a whole lot of things that just have to get done.”Following Wallace’s segment on Friday, the president stood by his attacks on Pelosi, suggesting to reporters that he tweeted out the manipulated video of Pelosi to “help the country” while claiming he only “responded in kind” because she “made horrible statements” about him.Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


Rape and incest account for hardly any abortions. So why are they now a focus?

Rape and incest account for hardly any abortions. So why are they now a focus? Just 1% of women obtain an abortion because they became pregnant through rape, and less than 0.5% do so because of incest.


Trump memo: Former intelligence officials and Democrats attack president's 'un-American' security instructions

Trump memo: Former intelligence officials and Democrats attack president's 'un-American' security instructions Donald Trump gave attorney general William Barr the unilateral authority to declassify intelligence documents and ordered the US intelligence community to “quickly and fully cooperate” with his work in an official memorandum.The move is meant to accelerate Mr Barr’s inquiry into whether US officials improperly monitored or carried out surveillance on the president’s 2016 campaign.The directive signed on Thursday night alarmed former intelligence officials and Democratic legislators, who see it as a move to “investigate the investigators” probing the president’s alleged ties to Russia.David Kris, former head of the justice department’s national security division, told the AP that it’s “very unusual — unprecedented in my experience — for a non-intelligence officer to be given absolute declassification authority over the intelligence”.John McLaughlin, former deputy director of the CIA who served as acting director in 2004, tweeted disapproval as well.“Giving Barr declassification authority for this investigation is a really bad idea,” Mr McLaughlin wrote. “The agencies can cooperate but must retain their legal responsibility for protecting sources. Congressional intelligence committees need to stand in the door on this one.”The move gives Mr Barr the power to unilaterally unseal documents that the justice department has historically regarded as among its most highly secret, such as warrants obtained from the foreign intelligence surveillance court, which are never usually made public.Mr Trump also gave the declassification power explicitly to Mr Barr, noting that it would not extend to another attorney general. It is to be used only for Mr Barr’s review of the Russia investigation.Senator Mark Warner, the ranking Democrat on the Senate intelligence committee, pointed out that lawmakers still do not have the full Mueller report.“So of course the president gives sweeping declassification powers to an attorney general who has already shown that he has no problem selectively releasing information in order to mislead the American people,” Mr Warner tweeted on Friday morning. Representative Adam Schiff, chairman of the House intelligence committee, called Mr Trump’s decision “un-American”.“While Trump stonewalls the public from learning the truth about his obstruction of justice, Trump and Barr conspire to weaponise law enforcement and classified information against their political enemies,” Mr Schiff wrote on Twitter. “The cover-up has entered a new and dangerous phase.”


Rep. Nadler falls ill during public meeting on Upper West Side

Rep. Nadler falls ill during public meeting on Upper West Side Rep. Jerry Nadler, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, became ill during a public meeting on speed cameras with Mayor de Blasio on the Upper West Side.


UPDATE 2-Global Payments nearing $20 bln deal to buy Total System - source

UPDATE 2-Global Payments nearing $20 bln deal to buy Total System - source Payment technology company Global Payments Inc is nearing a deal to acquire peer Total System Services Inc (TSYS) for about $20 billion in an all-stock deal, a source familiar with the matter said on Friday. The transaction, which the source said could be announced as soon as Tuesday, is the latest large-scale consolidation effort by payments technology companies as industry players seek domination when spending is increasingly cashless. Both companies' stock prices jumped on news of a potential deal: by mid-afternoon on Friday, Global Payments had risen 3.4% and TSYS gained 11.4%.


Facebook accused of leaving 'broken children' in wake of its commercial aims, abuse inquiry hears

Facebook accused of leaving 'broken children' in wake of its commercial aims, abuse inquiry hears Facebook has been accused of leaving 'broken children' as collateral damage in the wake of their commercial aims, the child sex abuse inquiry has heard. Barrister William Chapman, representing the victims of abuse at the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse (IICSA), said social media companies were not preventing paedophiles reaching children as it was “contrary to their business model” and that their apps needed to be “fundamentally redesigned”. Police also warned that tech firms were going ahead with plans to encrypt more features "in the certain knowledge" it would lead to more children being abused. The warnings came as the inquiry’s hearing into online child abuse drew to a close yesterday. Over the last fortnight IICSA has heard evidence from Facebook, Apple, Microsoft and Google about their efforts to combat child abuse online. Giving his closing statement, Mr Chapman singled out Facebook as the “unacceptable face of social media”, citing that over half of reported grooming offences in 2017 and 2018 related to the company or its Instagram and WhatsApp apps. William Chapman giving his closing address to the inquiry He said that social networks scanned for evidence of abuse after it happened and that they now needed to change their business model to stop abusers easily contacting children. Mr Chapman said: “What they will not do, because it is contrary to their business model, is to restrict the opportunities for abuse before it takes place.” He added: “They leave behind broken children like so much collateral damage. “Money, they say, is no object but none you heard from has a dedicated budget to tackling this problem.” Among the recommendations being made to the inquiry on behalf of victims are for tech companies pay compensation to those abused via their services and that a new criminal offence be made of posing online as a child online without a reasonable excuse. Mr Chapman also accused tech companies of not giving the inquiry a “straight answer” about the scale of abuse on their sites and selectively releasing figures without context. Earlier in the hearing Microsoft failed to provide figures for how many children had been groomed on its live chat services Xbox Live and Skype and Facebook was similarly unable to say how many registered sex offenders had been caught using its services. “It is not acceptable to hide the extent of the problem on your platform in a black box out of which you prick pinholes for others to see only hints of the full horror within," said Mr Chapman. Later in the hearing, Debra Powell QC, speaking for the National Police Chiefs Council, warned that tech giants' plans to make ever more services encrypted would lead to more children being abused. Last month Facebook announced plans to add end-to-end encryption to its 1.3 billion-user Messenger service, meaning not even it will be able to see the content of messages. Ms Powell said: “Currently many technology companies are building in and offering to their users ever greater privacy protections, including end-to-end encryption, in the certain knowledge that this will make the detection and prevention of child sexual abuse and exploitation more difficult. “The inevitable result must be that more children will be abused and exploited and that their ordeals will go on for longer before the perpetrators can be caught, if they are caught at all.”



Business - Google News

Disaster relief bill stuck in the House following GOP lawmaker's objection - CNN

Missouri's governor signs bill that bans abortion after 8 weeks - CNN

Missouri's governor signs bill that bans abortion after 8 weeks   CNN

Missouri's governor on Friday signed into law a strict anti-abortion bill that prohibits abortions after eight weeks of pregnancy.

View full coverage on Google News

President Trump Tweets Montage Mocking Pelosi: "Stammers Through News Conference" - RealClearPolitics

Wall Street gains on trade reprieve ahead of long weekend - Investing.com

Wall Street gains on trade reprieve ahead of long weekend   Investing.com

(Reuters) - U.S. stocks gained on Friday, ahead of a long Memorial day weekend, as investors breathed a sigh of relief after President Donald Trump indicated ...

View full coverage on Google News

Sports News Headlines - Yahoo! News

Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game

Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.


Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline

Is there a crisis with our boys? Expert says they need love, not discipline “Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. You can watch the current week's full episode of “Dear Men” every Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on Roku. So why are young men struggling? So I don’t never hold back my tears when I'm feeling an emotional overload,” he said.


Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it

Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I'm still coping with it It has been a year since former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for abusing more than 150 girls. But Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman is still coming to terms with the sexual abuse she experienced as a teenager.


Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it

Aly Raisman on Larry Nassar assault: Sometimes people forget I’m still coping with it Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman tells the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes” that she sometimes finds it difficult to hear the graphic details in the sexual assault stories of others, as she is still coping with her own traumatic experience.


For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness

For the love of the brain: One mother's fight for CTE awareness Karen Kinzle Zegel spends her days working on the Patrick Risha CTE Awareness Foundation website, fielding questions and giving out information on a disease she barely knew existed five years ago – until it took the life of her son, for whom the foundation is named. Karen remembers, “We were a football family, his dad was a coach, I would cheer and yell and you know, do all the things the football mom does. At the time, she was unaware of CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head – and the role it was playing in Patrick’s life.



April 9th, 2012

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